Wednesday, August 23, 2006

New Queries

Here are some new queries from the Wharton Society site. If you have any replies, please send them to whartonqueries at yahoo dot com. Thanks.


Wharton and Electricity

Hi all,
Is there someone who's written on electricity in Wharton's works? I seem to recall hearing a conference paper about this years ago, but I didn't find anything when on the MLA bibliography.

Thanks in advance,
Meredith Goldsmith
Assistant Professor of English
Ursinus College
mgoldsmith at ursinus dot edu



"The Confessional" Is there any printed edition of the short story "The Confessional"?

Thank you for your help
Giulietta Bertoni

8/23/06




EW at the Paris World's Fair of 1889? For a book about the Paris World's Fair of 1889, I wonder if anyone can tell me if Edith Wharton was a visitor and if there are any of her letters or journals from the summer of 1889 describing her visit.

jill jonnes jonnes at starpower dot com

8/23/06


Name: ingrid Christophersen Question: Would you be kind enough and let me know whether the Pavillion Colombe in Saint Brice is open to the public. Many thanks, kind regards, Ingrid Christophersen

SUBMIT: Submit Form



Edition of Madame de Treymes

As part of an auction lot we've come across a first UK edition of Madame de Treymes published by Macmillan in 1907 in orange boards. We can't find references anywhere to this edition - are you able to shed any light for us please? Many thanks.

Mark Crockermark at mcrocker.co.uk 8/23/06





Letters from Wharton to Morton Fullerton


I am doing research for a film and wanted to know the specifics in regard to the discovery or the letters of Edith Wharton to Morton Fullerton which are now housed at the University of Texas in Austin. I would like to know the following:

When were the letters discovered? (mm/dd/yy if possible)

Where were they discovered? What city or town? More specifically, were they in a desk drawer, an attic, etc.

Who discovered them?

Any other information would be greatly appreciated.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Dan

Daniel Lettieri







Epigraph of Age of Innocence

In a Norton Classical Edition of "The Age of Innocence" there is an article by Jennifer Rae Greeson discussing three outlines of "The Age..." Edith Wharton wrote before its final publication. The editor (Candace Waid) remarked that shortly before this volume was published Jennifer Rae Greeson doscovered a sort of epigraph (in quotation marks) on the last of the original outlines, on the top of the page. It is probably written in Arabic. Can somebody tell me what this short quotation means?
thank you
MAGDALENA PERDEK

magdalen22 at poczta.fm

7/23/06






"Sara" or "Sally" Clayburn in "All Souls"?

Wharton's short story 'All Souls'' describes what happened to the character named Sara Clayburn. In the Library of America 2001 edition (Collected Stories 1911-1937) p.799 appears the name 'Sally Clayburn' instead. This name isn't repeated in the rest of the story and, if I'm not mistaken, doesn't refer to any other possible character. Is it a mistake, or should I reread the text to understand it better? Armelle Chastrusse, chastrusse at hotmail.com 6/28/06

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1 Comments:

Blogger Edith said...

Here are some articles that will provide this information:

Price, Kenneth M., and Phyllis McBride. "'The Life Apart': Texts and Contexts of Edith Wharton's Love Diary." American Literature 66.4 (1994): 663-88.

Colquitt, Clare. "Unpacking Her Treasures: Edith Wharton's 'Mysterious Correspondence' with Morton Fullerton." Library Chronicle of the University of Texas 31 (1985): 73-107.


Gribben, Alan. "'the Heart Is Insatiable': A Selection from Edith Wharton's Letters to Morton Fullerton, 1907-1915." Library Chronicle of the University of Texas 31 (1985): 7-18.

You might also want to check R. W. B. Lewis and Nancy Lewis's edition of Wharton's letters; see also R. W. B. Lewis's and Shari Benstock's biographies of Wharton and Marion Mainwaring's The Mysteries of Paris: The Quest for Morton Fullerton.

9:05 AM  

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